Successes And Failures

Successes And Failures

There are many factors that contribute to the success or failure of urban plantings. These factors form the basis for the second module of the Which Plant Where research program.

  • Commencing: June 2017
  • Completion: June 2019

Connecting Successful Or Failed Plantings To Environment Information

There are many factors that contribute to the success or failure of urban plantings. These factors form the basis for the second module of the Which Plant Where research program:

  • The conditions to which those species are exposed during their early establishment phase (such as soil quality, nutrient supply, watering, heat stress or other factors that might affect their early survival).
  • Long-term climate factors such as urban heat effects, drought stress or insect or fungal damage, or subsequent groundworks that might damage plant roots.

By working with stakeholders across all links throughout the plant supply chain, we can obtain a wide range of data on the factors that make or break a successful urban planting. This way, we can learn from what has previously worked and avoid the factors that clearly contribute to reduced planting success, or even failure, in the urban context.

How Will We Achieve This?

By identifying partners, such as councils, that are willing to share data and results of historic plantings across a range of urban settings. This will help us to evaluate success rates in relation to environmental and species selection decisions.

By selecting a range of target locations where we can conduct much more detailed and longer-term monitoring of the sites, with consideration of climatic conditions, soil attributes, watering regime, fertiliser use and the presence of pathogens.

By establishing new test-planting sites where we plant a range of species and monitor their performance under contrasting climatic and soil attributes. Here, we are particularly interested in species that are only just coping with current temperatures and rainfall regimes to assess how they respond to more challenging climatic conditions.

We are also interested in the additional benefits that urban greening brings to our cities and towns, such as greater numbers of birds, insects and other wildlife, cleaner air and cooler temperatures at street level, and associated benefits to human health and well-being.